Friday, March 15, 2013

New Disability.Blog Post about How Assistive Technology Promotes Independence for People in Nursing Facilities

Assistive Technology Promotes Independence for People in Nursing Facilities
By Guest Blogger Chava Kintisch, Staff Attorney and Assistive Technology Project Director, Disability Rights Network of Pennsylvania
Many people with disabilities living in nursing facilities cannot operate a manual wheelchair or communicate through speech.  However, people in these facilities can gain independence through Medicaid-funded assistive technology, such as power wheelchairs and augmentative communication devices.  This independence can help support their transition back into the community.
According to the Assistive Technology Act of 2004, 29 U.S.C. § 3002, an assistive technology device is “any item, piece of equipment or product system, whether acquired commercially, modified or customized, that is used to increase, maintain or improve functional capabilities of individuals with disabilities.”  This includes durable medical equipment (DME) and an unlimited range of other items that people with disabilities use in their daily lives.  Assistive technology services include evaluation, adaptation, training, repairs and maintenance.r communicate through speech.  However, people in these facilities can gain independence through Medicaid-funded assistive technology, such as power wheelchairs and augmentative communication devices.  This independence can help support their transition back into the community.
Read More About Assistive Technology

Just posted on Monday...
Can Dance Include and Embrace Us All?
By Guest Blogger Alana Wallace, Founder and Artistic Director, Dance>Detour
Dance for someone who uses a wheelchair? I didn’t think so! I thought, “You’ve got to be kidding!” I must admit, as a professional actor and vocalist, the inclusion of dance in my career was a hard sell to me initially. I did not think artists with physical disabilities could legitimately compete, nor be taken seriously, in the arena of dance.
But in 1995, I was wowed when I witnessed my first physically integrated dance performance by the Cleveland Ballet Dancing Wheels (now known as “Dancing Wheels”). What thrilled me most about the company was the fact that their dancers who used wheelchairs were equal participants in the performance. I always thought that people who danced in wheelchairs could only flap their arms and that the non-disabled dancers manipulated their wheelchairs and dominated the movement. Gosh, was I wrong! Dancing Wheels blew me away. I immediately knew this had to become a new genre for me to explore.
 Read More About Can Dance Include and Embrace Us All

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